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Diagnostic dilemma: metastatic bone malignancy or primary hyperparathyroidism with brown tumor

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DOI: 10.4236/ojim.2013.32015    3,388 Downloads   4,867 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Multiple osteolytic lesions are usually associated with metastatic involvement of the bone. However metabolic bone diseases should also take their place in differential diagnosis. Here, we describe a primary hyperparathyroidism case with full-blown osteolytic lesions wich was diagnosed at first sight with having metastatic bone involvement. PET CT scan and laboratory results excluded a metastatic bone malignancy. Elevated serum calcium of 13.16 mg/dl, decreased serum phoshorus of 1.4 mg/dl and high intact-PTH level of 1054.7 pg/ml pointed out primary hyperparathyroidism. Sonographic examination revealed two adenomas of 2.9 × 3.3 mmand 3.3 ×2.7 mmin the left superior and right inferior parathyroid glands, respectively. Scintigraphy confirmed the presence of adenoma on the left.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Hatipoglu, E. , Eskazan, A. , Celik, O. , Kantarci, F. and Kadioglu, P. (2013) Diagnostic dilemma: metastatic bone malignancy or primary hyperparathyroidism with brown tumor. Open Journal of Internal Medicine, 3, 60-62. doi: 10.4236/ojim.2013.32015.

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