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Muscle endurance measurement using a progressive workload and a constant workload by maximal voluntary contraction

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DOI: 10.4236/health.2010.211186    4,880 Downloads   9,400 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Muscle endurance measurement using a progressive workload method may reduce pain sensation in the subject. This study aimed to examine the relationships between force-time parameters during sustained static gripping as measured by maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) using either a progressive workload (PW) or a constant workload (CW). Sixteen subjects performed sustained static gripping with 7 gradually increasing relative demand values of 20% to 80% MVC and sustained static gripping by MVC. The staging of progressive workload was 10 s for 20% MVC, 20 s each for 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70% MVC, and 10 s for 80% MVC. The forces exerted at 120 s in the CW and PW methods were at around the 23-27% MVC level. Peak force, final force, and force during the last 30 s for the PW method evaluated muscle endurance after 1 min and showed high correlations (r = 0.746 ? 0.895). Significant correlations (r = 0.575 ? 0.605) were found between time to 40% MVC in the CW method and peak force, final force, and force in the last 30 s in the PW method group. The peak force in the PW method may be useful for evaluating muscle endurance with a short testing time and without high pain sensation.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Demura, S. and Nakada, M. (2010) Muscle endurance measurement using a progressive workload and a constant workload by maximal voluntary contraction. Health, 2, 1255-1259. doi: 10.4236/health.2010.211186.

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