Share This Article:

Association among Serum Organochlorine Pesticide Residues, Glutathione S-Transferase M1 Genetic Polymorphism and Female Breast Cancer

Abstract Full-Text HTML XML Download Download as PDF (Size:216KB) PP. 19-23
DOI: 10.4236/abcr.2013.22005    2,489 Downloads   5,188 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association among serum organochlorine pesticide residues, glutathione S-transferase M1 genetic polymorphism and female breast cancer. Methods: A 1:1 matched case-control study of 140 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients and 140 non-cancer female patients who consulted the five largest hospitals in the Tangshan city from September 2006 to October 2007. Results: The result showed higher risk of breast cancer among subjects with higher levels of serum DDT and HCH residue, the OR was 3.18 (95%CI, 1.11 - 9.07) and 5.02 (95%CI, 1.64 - 16.56).The value of ORe associated with single environmental factor DDT high residues, and ORg associated with single GSTM1 deletion genotype were respectively 3.86 (1.20 - 12.47) and 1.34 (0.36 - 5.08). The OReg associated with combined action of two factors was 5.59 (1.63 - 18.90), and the value of interaction parameters (γ) equaled 1.24. The value of ORe associated with single environmental factor HCH higher residue and ORg associated with single GSTM1 deletion genotype were respectively 2.73 (0.84 - 8.87) and 1.48 (0.49 - 4.60). The value of OReg associated with combined action of two factors was 3.87 (1.18 - 12.68), and γ equaled 1.38. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer occurrence was the combined result of environmental and genetic factors. The concurrent action of GSTM1 deletion genotype and DDT/HCH enhanced the risk of breast cancer.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Li, J. , Jiang, S. , Chang, Y. , Guo, Z. , Yao, S. , Yuan, J. and Li, G. (2013) Association among Serum Organochlorine Pesticide Residues, Glutathione S-Transferase M1 Genetic Polymorphism and Female Breast Cancer. Advances in Breast Cancer Research, 2, 19-23. doi: 10.4236/abcr.2013.22005.

References

[1] Q. J. Zhou, Z. P. Wang and F. B. Chen, “Research on Community Revert and Social Problems of Earthquake Stricnken Area in Tangshan,” Earthquake Publish Company, Beijing, 1997, pp. 398-401.
[2] J. Y. Li, D. S. Wu, F. Yang, H. Y. Zeng, F. M. Lei, W. D. Zhou, H. Li and P. Tao, “A Case-Control Study on Exposure of Serum Organochlorine Pesticide DDT, CYP1A1 Gene Polymorphism and Breast Cancer,” Chinese Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 27, No. 3, 2006, pp. 217-222.
[3] K. Chen, X. Y. Ma and K. Y. Yao, “A Case-Control Study on the Association among Glutathione S-Transferases, Gene Polymorphism, Smoking and Rectum and Colon Cancer,” China Tumour Journal, Vol. 26, No. 11, 2004, pp. 645-648.
[4] M. J. Khoury and D. K. Wagener, “Epidemiological Evaluation of the Use of Genetics to Improve the Predictive Value of Disease Risk Factors,” The American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 56, No. 4, 1995, pp. 835-844.
[5] E. E. Calle, H. Frumkin, S. J. Henley, D. A. Savitz and M. J. Thun, “Organochlorines and Breast Cancer Risk,” A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, Vol. 52, No. 5, 2002, pp. 301-309.
[6] A. Demers, P. Ayotte, J. Brisson, S. Dodin, J. Robert and E. Dewailly, “Risk and Aggressiveness of Breast Cancer in Relation to Plasma Organochlorine Concentrations,” Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2000, pp. 161-166.
[7] R. Isabelle, H. A. Mauricio, L. P. Eduardo, J. P. Weber and E. Dewailly, “Breast Cancer, Lactation History, and Serum Organochlorines,” American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 152, No. 4, 2000, pp. 363-370. doi:10.1093/aje/152.4.363
[8] J. Y. Li, H. Li, F. M. Lei and D. S. Wu, “A Meta-Analysis on Relationship between DDE Contents in Body and Human Breast Cancer,” Modern Preventive Medicine, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2005, pp. 91-93, 110.
[9] N. Krieger, M. S. Wolff, R. A. Hiatt, et al., “Breast Cancer and Serum Organochlorines: A Prospective Study among White, Black, and Asian Women,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 86, No. 8, 1994, pp. 589-599. doi:10.1093/jnci/86.8.589
[10] R. Millikan, E. DeVoto, E. J. Duell, et al., “Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Breast Cancer among African-American and White Women in North,” Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 9, No. 11, 2000, pp. 1233-1240.
[11] X. M. Hua and Z. J. Shan, “Analysis of Pesticides Production, Using Status and Impact Factors,” Environmental Scientific Advance, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1996, pp. 33-45.
[12] S. K. Park, D. Kang, D. Y. Noh, K. M. Lee, S. U. Kim, J. Y. Choi, I. M. Choi, S. H Ahn, K. J. Choe, A. Hirvonen, P. T. Strickland and K. Y. Yoo, “Reproductive Factors, Glutathione S-Transferase M1 and T1 Genetic Polymorphism and Breast Cancer Risk,” Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 78, No. 1, 2003, pp. 89-96. doi:10.1023/A:1022113713226
[13] J. Y. Jiang, Y. B. Xiang, M. H. Tao and W. H. Xu, “The Research Advances on the Gene-Environment Interaction of Breast Cancer,” Tumor, Vol. 31, No. 6, 2011, pp. 558-564.
[14] X. H. Xu, L. Amy, B. Dailey, L. Evelyn, O. Talbott, et al., “Associations of Serum Concentrations of Organochlorine Pesticides with Breast Cancer and Prostate Cancer in US Adults,” Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 118, No. 1, 2010, pp. 60-66.
[15] T. R. Rebbeck, “Molecular Epidemiology of the Human Glutathione S-Transferase Genotypes GSTM1 and GSTT1 in Cancer Susceptibility,” Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, Vol. 6, No. 9, 1997, pp. 733-743.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2018 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.