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A Critical Analysis of Selected Policy Making Decisions in the US and the UK with Regard to the Implementation of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in National State Primary and Secondary School Education Systems

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DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2013.31012    7,758 Downloads   15,362 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Information and Communication Technology has played an important and pervasive role in modern business and everyday living over the last decade and more. The industry accounts for trillions of annual revenue. Yet, it has proved hard for a similar role for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to emerge in education. In this paper, I will argue that policy regarding ICT use at national state levels in the UK and the US has striven to create, and continues to perpetuate, a system of education with technological divisions of labour, and marginalized innovative and communicative practical uses of technology for enhancing education in schools.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Brooke, M. (2013). A Critical Analysis of Selected Policy Making Decisions in the US and the UK with Regard to the Implementation of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in National State Primary and Secondary School Education Systems. Open Journal of Modern Linguistics, 3, 94-99. doi: 10.4236/ojml.2013.31012.

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