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Optimal Aerations in the Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor When Used in Treatment of Industrial Wastewaters of Various Strength

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DOI: 10.4236/aces.2012.23046    3,404 Downloads   5,995 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The aim of this work was the determination of the optimal aerations, and more specifically the corresponding optimal air velocities uopt, at which the largest COD removals were achieved in treatment of industrial wastewaters of various strength conducted in the inverse fluidized bed biofilm reactor. The largest COD removals were achieved at the following air velocities uopt and retention times ts, and (Vb/VR) = 0.55: i) for CODo = 72,780 mg/l at uopt = 0.052 m/s and ts = 80 h ; ii) for CODo = 62,070 mg/l at uopt = 0.042 m/s and ts = 65 h; iii) for CODo = 49,130 mg/l at uopt = 0.033 m/s and ts= 55 h ; iv) for CODo = 41,170 mg/l at uopt = 0.028 m/s and ts = 45 h; v) for CODo = 35,460 mg/l at uopt = 0.025 m/s and ts = 27.5 h; and vi) for CODo = 26,470 mg/l at uopt= 0.014 m/s and ts = 22.5 h. In the treatment operation conducted in a reactor optimally controlled at the above values of uopt, ts and (Vb/VR), the following decreases in COD were obtained: i) from 72,780 to 5410 mg/l; ii) from 62,070 to 3730 mg/l; iii) from 49,130 to 2820 mg/l; iv) from 41,170 to 1820 mg/l; v) from 35,460 to 1600 mg/l; and vi) from 26,470 to 1180 mg/l, that is, approximately a 93%, 94%, 95%, 96%, 95% and 96% COD reduction was attained, respectively.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

W. Sokół, "Optimal Aerations in the Inverse Fluidized Bed Biofilm Reactor When Used in Treatment of Industrial Wastewaters of Various Strength," Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science, Vol. 2 No. 3, 2012, pp. 384-391. doi: 10.4236/aces.2012.23046.

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