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A survey of awareness and knowledge of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in pregnant women attending Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2012.22019    4,463 Downloads   8,326 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the knowledge and awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) among women attending the antenatal clinic. Methods and Subjects: This was primarily a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out at the antenatal clinic of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH), Sagamu, Nigeria from July 1st, 2010 to October 31st, 2010. Results: The age range of the respondents was 18 - 41 years, (mean 29 ± 5 years). One hundred and forty-nine (92.5%) were married. All the respondents interviewed were aware of HIV/AIDS and 93 (57.8%) had been aware of the disease for ≥5 years. The main sources of information were television 93 (57.8%), radio 77 (47.8%), health workers 53 (32.9%), friends, relatives and neighbors 41 (25.5%) and posters 34 (21.1%). Majority of the respondents identified sexual intercourse as a route of transmission of HIV. Sharing of sharp objects and blood transfusion were identified as routes of transmission by 99 (61.5%) and 82 (50.9%) respectively. One hundred and sixteen (72%) of the respondents knew an apparently healthy person could be living with HIV. Majority of the respondents 125 (77.6%) were aware that HIV can coexist with pregnancy and 120 (74.5%) were aware of MTCT of HIV. Vaginal delivery and breastfeeding were identified as routes of HIV transmission by 44 (27.3%) and 53 (32.9%) of respondents respectively. Delivery by caesarean section was identified as a method of prevention of MTCT by 25 (15.5%) respondents while as many as 48 (29.8%) respondents did not know any method of prevention of MTCT of HIV. Conclusion: This study demonstrates a low level of awareness of methods of prevention of MTCT of HIV among pregnant women booking for antenatal care in our center. Thus, there is the need for adequate counseling about HIV/AIDS and specific aspects of prevention of mother-to-child transmission in our antenatal clinics.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Adelaja Lamina, M. (2012) A survey of awareness and knowledge of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in pregnant women attending Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2, 98-105. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2012.22019.

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