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A Value-Based and Multi-Level Model of Macro Economies

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DOI: 10.4236/ti.2010.11005    5,209 Downloads   8,314 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

There is sufficient evidence that performance levels of various economic systems differ. All systems seem to have particular benefits, but all of them are adequately aligned with the dynamics and complexity of con-temporary societies. In this paper, the author introduces a sequence of ideal type economic systems, based on Spiral Dynamics, a theory explaining levels of existence within people, groups of people, organizations and societies. Per type the author elaborates on the underlying value systems and relating institutional structures, such as leadership style, governance and measurement format.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

M. Marrewijk, "A Value-Based and Multi-Level Model of Macro Economies," Technology and Investment, Vol. 1 No. 1, 2010, pp. 35-48. doi: 10.4236/ti.2010.11005.

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