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Baddeley, A. D., & Hitch, G. J. (1974). Working Memory. In G. A. Bower (Ed.), Recent Advances in Learning and Motivation (Vol. 8, pp. 47-89). New York: Academic Press.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0079-7421(08)60452-1

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Social Framework of Learning via Neurodidactics

    AUTHORS: Chournazidi Anastasia

    KEYWORDS: Associative Learning, Neurodidactics, Emotion, Motivation, Memory, Socialization

    JOURNAL NAME: Creative Education, Vol.7 No.15, September 20, 2016

    ABSTRACT: Both from a pedagogical and a psychological point of view, but also from sociology, we are aware of the fact that learning is a permanently successful process, taking into consideration that learning in the school environment does not bear significant practical differences from learning in our normal, social lives. Since the 18th century already, educational theories have been developed, accepting teaching methods focusing on learning processes, in accordance with human’s brain functions and aiming not for an individual, but a social aspect of learning, enhancing the individual’s self- efficacy in society. Neurodidactics investigates these two parameters, in an effort to introduce brain research scientific results into courses, forging at the same time the frameworks and prerequisites used to establish knowledge that was correctly structured and integrated in a context of emotional motivation. The neurodidactics’ aim is to encourage and support the management and process of learning, in a stress-free, reliable, social learning context. The following analysis of these theories should assist teachers in understanding and explaining their students’ experiences and behaviors, which should always be related to the students’ brain functions and physical-mental functions, as part of a learning group.