SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

Article citations

More>>

Greiff, L., Andersson, M. and Persson, C.G.A. (2001) Nasal Secretions and Exudations: Collection and Approaches to Analysis. In: Rogers, D.F. and Donnelly, L.E., Eds., Methods in Molecular Medicine, Humana Press, Totowa, 56, 61-73.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Clinical Study on ColdZyme® Mouth Spray against Rhinovirus-Induced Common Cold

    AUTHORS: Mats Clarsund, Marcus Fornbacke, Lena Uller, Sebastian L. Johnston, Cecilia Ahlström Emanuelsson

    KEYWORDS: Common Cold, Rhinovirus, ColdZyme®® Mouth Spray

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Respiratory Diseases, Vol.7 No.4, October 16, 2017

    ABSTRACT: Common colds incur significant costs in terms of sick leave and personal discomfort for affected individuals. This study investigated the performance of ColdZyme® Mouth Spray (ColdZyme), a protective barrier against common cold, in rhinovirus-inoculated healthy volunteers. This randomized, doubleblind, placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted on 46 healthy volunteers inoculated with rhinovirus 16 via the nose. Subjects self-administered ColdZyme or placebo 6 times daily for 11 days. Symptoms were recorded daily in a diary. Rhinovirus 16 in nasal and oropharyngeal samples at days 0, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 10 were quantified by RT-qPCR. The primary outcome measure was the reduction in viral load in oropharyngeal samples. Rhinovirus 16 was only detected in 35 out of 46 inoculated subjects. Exploratory analysis measuring the total viral load (i.e., area under the curve (AUC)) for days 3 - 10 in successfully inoculated subjects found that ColdZyme treatment resulted in a lower total viral load in the oropharynx (p = 0.023). In subjects who experienced symptomatic common cold, irrespectively, if virus were detected, treatment with ColdZyme resulted in a reduction in the number of days with common cold symptoms from 6.5 to 3.0 days (p = 0.014) in comparison to placebo. ColdZyme reduced virus infection in the oropharynx and reduced the number of days with common cold symptoms and highlights the possible importance of the oropharynx in common cold infections. Suitable outcome measures for a feasible study on ColdZyme are total viral load in the oropharynx in subjects having detectable virus present in nasal or oropharyngeal samples.