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Seneff, S., Swanson, N. and Li, C. (2015) Aluminum and Glyphosate Can Synergistically Induce Pineal Gland Pathology: Connection to Gut Dysbiosis and Neurological Disease. Agricultural Science, 6, 42-70.
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/as.2015.61005

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Death as a Drug Side Effect in FAERS: Is Glyphosate Contamination a Factor?

    AUTHORS: Stephanie Seneff, Nancy Swanson, Chen Li, Gerald Koenig

    KEYWORDS: Drug Side Effects, Drug Contamination, Renal Failure, Glyphosate, Pancreatitis, Osteonecrosis, Protamine Sulfate, Aprotinin, Oedema

    JOURNAL NAME: Agricultural Sciences, Vol.6 No.12, December 28, 2015

    ABSTRACT: An analysis of selected datasets from the FDA’s drug Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) leads us to hypothesize that glyphosate contamination in both food and drugs is a major contributor to chronic and acute kidney failure respectively. In chronic kidney failure, glyphosate-induced pancreatitis results in the release of trypsin, causing a leaky vasculature. The albumin-bound glyphosate escapes into the tissues, protecting the circulatory system and kidneys but resulting in multiple symptoms related to skin, gut, brain, bones, lungs, etc. The rare and poorly understood acute kidney failure response reported for protamine sulfate and Trasylol? is strikingly similar to that associated with glyphosate poisoning. Both drugs are derived from biological tissues that are plausibly contaminated with glyphosate. These drugs protect from haemorrhage, which leads to retention of glyphosate in the vasculature, are followed by circulatory collapse and a high likelihood of death as an outcome. We support our argument by comparing symptom profiles of selected subsets of FAERS with those related to glyphosate poisoning, anomalous reactions to protamine sulfate, and conditions showing strong statistical time-trend correlations with glyphosate.