SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Article citations

More>>

Shannon, C. (1949) Proceedings of the IRE, 37, 10-21.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JRPROC.1949.232969

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Statistical Analysis of Subsurface Diffusion of Solar Energy with Implications for Urban Heat Stress

    AUTHORS: M. P. Silverman

    KEYWORDS: Time Series Analysis, Heat Conduction, Thermal Diffusion, Power Laws, Climate Change, Heat-Island Effect

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Modern Physics, Vol.5 No.9, June 23, 2014

    ABSTRACT: Analysis of hourly underground temperature measurements at a medium-size (by population) US city as a function of depth and extending over 5+ years revealed a positive trend exceeding the rate of regional and global warming by an order of magnitude. Measurements at depths greater than ~2 m are unaffected by daily fluctuations and sense only seasonal variability. A comparable trend also emerged from the surface temperature record of the largest US city (New York). Power spectral analysis of deep and shallow subsurface temperature records showed respectively two kinds of power-law behavior: 1) a quasi-continuum of power amplitudes indicative of Brownian noise, superposed (in the shallow record) by 2) a discrete spectrum of diurnal harmonics attributable to the unequal heat flux between daylight and darkness. Spectral amplitudes of the deepest temperature time series (2.4 m) conformed to a log-hyperbolic distribution. Upon removal of seasonal variability from the temperature record, the resulting spectral amplitudes followed a log-exponential distribution. Dynamical analysis showed that relative amplitudes and phases of temperature records at different depths were in excellent accord with a 1-dimensional heat diffusion model.