SM> Vol.1 No.4, October 2011

Folklore and Northeast Indian History

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ABSTRACT

The article intends to highlight folklore as an alternative source for the writing of history, particularly of the northeastern region of India, which is inhabited by numerous tribal communities, and where there is a dearth of written documents, archaeological and other evidences. Folklore as a source is important to explain and understand societies in the context of preserving cultural diversity and protecting minority cultures, especially those of indigenous peoples and marginalized social groups. With the increased growth of several ethnic identity crises in the region in recent times, the roots for their respective indigenous history are often traced to folklore.

Cite this paper

Deka, M. (2011). Folklore and Northeast Indian History. Sociology Mind, 1, 173-176. doi: 10.4236/sm.2011.14022.

References

[1] Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1984
[2] Taylor, Archer: Definitions of Folklore.DICTIONARY OF FOLKLORE. supra note 35.
[3] Dutta, B. (2002). Folklore and Historiography. Chennai: National Folklore Support Centre.
[4] Dorson, RM. (1972) .Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction.In Dutta, op.cit.
[5] *The evolutionary theoryrepresented a framework of a unilinear cultural evolutionary sequence moving from savagery through barbarism to civilization. The peasantry represented the ‘barbarian’ or ‘uncivilized ‘section within a civilization, the ‘non-progressive class in a progressive people’ and the ‘non-literate in a literate society’. Exponents of this theory are Max Muller, the German Orientalist, EB Tylor, the British Anthropologist and Lewis Henry Morgan, the American Anthropologist. ‘Devolutionism’ imp
[6] The New Encyclopedia Britannica
[7] Handoo ,Jawaharlal. (1985).Folklore and Folklife: An Introduction. In Sen, Soumen(ed), Folklore in North East India. New Delhi: Omsons.
[8] Bhattacharjee ,JB. (2003). Supplementing Archival Materials: Search for Alternatives.In Insight: A Collection of Articles. Department of History. Gauhati University.
[9] WIPO Intellectual Property Handbook: Policy Law and Use. WIPO Publication No. 489(E).
[10] Kuruk, Paul. (1999). Protecting Folklore under Modern Intellectual Property Regimes: A Reappraisal of the Tensions between Individual and Communal Rights in Africa and the United States. http://www.wcl.american.edu/journal/lawrev/48/kuruk.pdf?rd=1 Accessed on 12.08.2009.
[11] Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1984.
[12] Dutta, B. (2002). Folklore and historiography. Chennai: National Folklore Support Centre.
[13] Dorson, R. M. (1972). Folklore and folklife: An introduction. In Dutta, op.cit.
[14] The New Encyclopedia Britannica
[15] Handoo, J. (1985). Folklore and folklife: An introduction. In S. Sen, (Ed.), Folklore in North East India. New Delhi: Omsons.
[16] Bhattacharjee, J. B. (2003). Supplementing archival materials: Search for alternatives. In Insight: A collection of articles. Department of History. Gauhati University.
[17] WIPO (2004) Intellectual property handbook: Policy law and use. WIPO Publication No. 489(E).
[18] Kuruk, P. (1999). Protecting folklore under modern intellectual property regimes: A reappraisal of the tensions between individual and communal rights in Africa and the United States. URL (last checked 12 August 2009). http://www.wcl.american.edu/journal/lawrev/48/kuruk.pdf?rd=1

  
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