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Implementation of a Blended-Learning Course as Part of Faculty Development

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DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.511108    2,909 Downloads   3,835 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

At the medical faculty at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich many E-Learning resources are available to students, but they are rarely implemented in a Blended-Learning scenario. To foster this, a Blended-Learning course following the Inverted Classroom (IC) model as part of the faculty development curriculum has been developed. An initial 10-day E-Learning phase was based on the following six modules: E-Learning and Blended-Learning basics, Learning Management Systems, Virtual Patients, educational videos, the IC model and other E-Learning methods. In the following half-day face-to-face workshop the course participants applied their knowledge to common teaching scenarios. The course was well accepted by the participants and will be further developed and continued as part of the faculty development curriculum.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Tolks, D. , Pelczar, I. , Bauer, D. , Brendel, T. , Görlitz, A. , Küfner, J. , Simonsohn, A. and Hege, I. (2014) Implementation of a Blended-Learning Course as Part of Faculty Development. Creative Education, 5, 948-953. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.511108.

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