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Refinement of total 12-lead QRS voltage criteria for diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy

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DOI: 10.4236/wjcd.2013.32030    3,604 Downloads   5,469 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Objective: We sought to test the hypothesis that the total QRS voltage without either set of the limb leads (I, II, III) or (R, L, F) may be a better indicator of LVH as compared to the total QRS voltage. Background: The total 12 lead QRS voltage has been a validated electrocardiographic criterion for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), with an upper limit of175 mm. However, there is some redundancy in this measurement as the output of the limb leads is repeated because leads I, II, III, and R, L, F use the same three electrodes. Methods: 43 unselected, consecutive echocardiograms were examined for evidence of LVH by wall thickness. Electrocardiogram (ECG) of these patients within a week of the echocardiogram were then examined for the total 12 leads QRS voltage, minus I, II, III and total minus R, L, F voltages. ECG findings were then compared with corresponding echocardiographic dimensions. Results: A total QRS voltage of123 mmon ECG yielded a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 67% for diagnosing LVH with 95% CI = 0.59 - 0.89, p = 0.007. Total minus (R, L and F) value of110 mmon ECG appears to give the best sensitivity (73%), specificity (72%), and accuracy (64% negative predictive value and 82% positive predictive value) for LVH. Conclusion: It appears that total QRS voltage minus either set of the limb leads, especially the total minus R, L and F is a better criterion, with110 mmbeing the best specific, sensitive and accurate index for diagnosing LVH.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Kumar, D. , Bajaj, R. , Chhabra, L. and Spodick, D. (2013) Refinement of total 12-lead QRS voltage criteria for diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy. World Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases, 3, 210-214. doi: 10.4236/wjcd.2013.32030.

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