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Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Approaches to Investigate Dynamics, Secondary Structure and Topology of Membrane Proteins

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DOI: 10.4236/ojbiphy.2012.24014    4,419 Downloads   8,475 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to determine the structural and dynamic properties of both membrane proteins and peptides in phospholipid bilayers [1-26]. From the perspective of the perpetuated lipids, 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe the effect of embedded proteins on the order and dynamics of the acyl chains of phospholipid bilayers [8-13]. Moreover, 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to investigate the interaction of peptides, proteins and drugs with phospholipid head groups [11-14]. The secondary structure of 13C = O site-specific isotopically labeled peptides or proteins inserted into lipid bilayers can be probed utilizing 13C CPMAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy [15-18]. Also, solid-state NMR spectroscopic studies can be utilized to ascertain pertinent informa- tion on the backbone and side-chain dynamics of 2H- and 15N-labeled proteins, respectively, in phospholipid bilayers [19-26]. Finally, specific 15N-labeled amide sites on a protein embedded inside oriented bilayers can be used to probe the alignment of the helices with respect to the bilayer normal [2]. A brief summary of all these solid-state NMR ap- proaches are provided in this minireview.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

S. Abu-Baker and G. Lorigan, "Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Approaches to Investigate Dynamics, Secondary Structure and Topology of Membrane Proteins," Open Journal of Biophysics, Vol. 2 No. 4, 2012, pp. 109-116. doi: 10.4236/ojbiphy.2012.24014.

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