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Using Spatial Econometrics to Measure Ozone Pollution Externalities

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DOI: 10.4236/jep.2012.329130    4,894 Downloads   6,769 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

This paper summarizes my previous work in Lin (2010), in which I use spatial econometrics to analyze air pollution externalities. In Lin (2010), state-by-state source-receptor transfer coefficients that can be used as a basis for a location- differentiated permit system are estimated. Results affirm the importance of regional transport in determining local ozone air quality, although owing to non-monotonicities in ozone production the externality is not always negative. Because the origin of emissions matters, results also reject a non-spatially differentiated NOx cap and trade program as an appropriate mechanism for reducing ozone smog.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

C. Lin, "Using Spatial Econometrics to Measure Ozone Pollution Externalities," Journal of Environmental Protection, Vol. 3 No. 9A, 2012, pp. 1117-1123. doi: 10.4236/jep.2012.329130.

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