Share This Article:

Cultivation Features Using Meteorological and Satellite Data from 2001 to 2010 in Dakhla Oasis, Egypt

Full-Text HTML XML Download Download as PDF (Size:1771KB) PP. 209-218
DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2015.73017    3,430 Downloads   3,962 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

The differences between the oasis region and the regions of the Nile delta and Nile valley in Egypt are due mainly to the regions’ access to water. The oasis region depends on underground water, while the other regions rely on the Nile River. Numerous studies on cultivation in the Nile delta have been accumulated. However, few studies have addressed cultivation in the oasis region. This study examines cultivation throughout the government and local well districts using meteorological and satellite data from 2001 to 2010, and the interview in Rashda Village, Dakhla Oasis. Since the reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is lower in winter than in summer, cultivation in winter makes sense from the viewpoint of saving irrigation water. Evapotranspiration is highest in the order of date palm, rice paddy, winter wheat, and clover hay under sufficient wet conditions in Rashda Village. Cultivation features and water requirements were examined using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). Results indicated a distinct difference in cultivation systems between the summer and winter seasons in the government well district. Water requirements for date palm in the local well district were 2.6 times those for winter plants in the government well district, using the accumulated NDWI value.

Cite this paper

Kimura, R. , Kato, H. and Iwasaki, E. (2015) Cultivation Features Using Meteorological and Satellite Data from 2001 to 2010 in Dakhla Oasis, Egypt. Journal of Water Resource and Protection, 7, 209-218. doi: 10.4236/jwarp.2015.73017.

Copyright © 2019 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.