ENG> Vol.3 No.12, December 2011

Slip Line Field Solution for Second Pass in Lubricated 4-High Reversing Cold Rolling Sheet Mill

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ABSTRACT

The development of a possible slip line field (slf) for theoretical calculations of the deforming pressure (load) in a second pass of a lubricated cold rolling sheet mill and validation using values from an aluminium sheet rolling mill was done in this work. This will be relevant in the manufacturing industries providing an easy method for determining necessary applied rolling load. Experimental rolling was carried out to observe the shear lines in the deformation field. Construction of possible slip line field model was developed adhering strictly to assumptions of rigid plastic model. Calculation of the deforming force/load was achieved using Hencky’s equation. Results showed that the load calculations for constructed slip line field using aluminium sheet rolling as an example tallied with values obtained from Tower Aluminium rolling mill. Slip line fields constructed for the second pass described adequately the rolling pressure in the cold rolling process, giving a valid solution of the exact load estimates on comparison with the industrial load values. Roll pressure along the arc of contact rose fairly linearly from the entrance to a maximum at the exit point. This work showed that slf for the first pass in a cold rolling mill cannot be used for subsequent passes; it requires construction of slfs for each pass in the cold rolling process.

Cite this paper

O. Oluwole and O. Olaogun, "Slip Line Field Solution for Second Pass in Lubricated 4-High Reversing Cold Rolling Sheet Mill," Engineering, Vol. 3 No. 12, 2011, pp. 1225-1233. doi: 10.4236/eng.2011.312152.

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