AA> Vol.4 No.2, May 2014

Perception of Local Community and Biradari on Panchayati: An Exploratory Anthropological Study of Biradari in Village Saroki, District Gujranwala, Pakistan

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ABSTRACT

The rural areas of Pakistan are well woven in the Biradari system which is also a social status carrier and an ethic attachment. The Biradari system is very much operational and playing a well participatory role in almost all kinds of community and local matters and issues ranging from very minor conflicts to big social disputes. The prime focus of the study was to explore the role of Biradari and community opinion regarding its respective role as Panchayat. The study was conducted in village Saroki of District Gujranwala where structured interview guide and participant observation were used as the key tools to explore the correlation of especially Biradari system with Panchayat. The research unveiled the role of Biradari by exploring the two sides of the pictures, including positive functions of Biradari and perception of communities about their negative role with a special focus on dispute management, resolving issues through traditional methods.

Cite this paper

Chaudhry, A. , Ahmed, A. , Khan, S. & Hussain, S. (2014). Perception of Local Community and Biradari on Panchayati: An Exploratory Anthropological Study of Biradari in Village Saroki, District Gujranwala, Pakistan. Advances in Anthropology, 4, 53-58. doi: 10.4236/aa.2014.42008.

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