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Ego Depletion After Social Interference

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.51001    4,458 Downloads   7,697 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The present study examines whether social interference (i.e., interference with one’s goal attainment by the bodily presence of others) depletes the limited resource of self-control strength. In an experimental laboratory study (N = 34), half the participants experienced social interference whereas the other half did not experience social interference by two confederates during a dexterity task. Afterwards, we measured participants’ momentary self-control strength applying a Stroop colour-naming task. In line with our prediction, participants’ performance in the Stroop task indicated that social interference reduced self-control strength. We discuss implications for crowding research and crowding in natural settings.

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Bertrams, A. & Pahl, S. (2014). Ego Depletion After Social Interference. Psychology, 5, 1-5. doi: 10.4236/psych.2014.51001.

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