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Size Analysis of the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene Upper Siwalik Sediments, Northwestern Himalaya, India

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DOI: 10.4236/ijg.2013.48106    3,202 Downloads   4,919 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Size analysis of the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene Upper Siwalik sediments comprising the Pinjor Formation in the type area and adjoining regions reveals that the sediments are bimodal to polymodal in nature, medium to fine grained and are moderately sorted. The inclusive graphic standard deviation and moment standard deviation values suggest the deposition of sediments in shallow to moderately deep fluvial agitated water. The log probability plots reveal that saltation mode is the dominant mode of transportation of detritus. The sediments are continental in character and are derived from crystalline, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks of the Himalaya exposed to the North of the type area Pinjor.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

M. Singh and A. Chaudhri, "Size Analysis of the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene Upper Siwalik Sediments, Northwestern Himalaya, India," International Journal of Geosciences, Vol. 4 No. 8, 2013, pp. 1120-1130. doi: 10.4236/ijg.2013.48106.

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