Health> Vol.5 No.6B, June 2013
Views: 2,067    Downloads: 567

Professional identities of occupational therapy practitioners in Japan

ABSTRACT

To aim to inductively clarify the professional identity of occupational therapists who work in a clinical setting, the researchers interviewed the 22 occupational therapists who had a minimum of 5 years or more of practice in the field. The professional identities of the practicing occupational therapists were constructed by the following two core categories: “harmonizing with a client’s life and the characteristic of a client’s disability”, and “giving clients sovereignties as a mission of the occupational therapists”. The occupational therapist can carry the role of coordinator in an interdisciplinary team for the clients with disability by understanding them. This is achieved based on the core category called “giving clients sovereignties as a mission of the occupational therapists”. Furthermore, in order to achieve the clients’ sovereignties, the occupational therapist can be an operational unit by planning practical strategies and practicing them based on the core category called “harmonizing with a client’s life and the characteristic of a client’s disability”. The fact is often difficult for these clients that they are concerned with how he/she lived actively. It is through unique ways of contributing for the clients in a team of professionals that the occupational therapists try to understand the clients not as “patients” but as “human beings”, and try to harmonize with their life and the characteristics of their disability, then try to support and empower them to reach a stage in which they have the sovereignties of their lives.

KEYWORDS


Cite this paper

Takashima, R. and Saeki, K. (2013) Professional identities of occupational therapy practitioners in Japan. Health, 5, 64-71. doi: 10.4236/health.2013.56A2010.

References

[1] World Federation of Occupational Therapists (2012) Definition of occupational therapy. http://www.wfot.org/AboutUs/AboutOccupationalTherapy/DefinitionofOccupationalTherapy.aspx
[2] World Federation of Occupational Therapists (2012) Occupational Therapy Human Resources Project 2012. http://www.wfot.org/ResourceCentre.aspx
[3] Kielhofner, G. (2004) Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy. 3rd Edition, F. A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, 27-71.
[4] Kielhofner, G. (2004) Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy. 3rd Edition, F. A. Davis Company, Philadelphia, 2-10.
[5] Baumeister, R.F. (1986) Identity: Cultural change and the struggle for self. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
[6] Corbin, J. and Strauss, A. (2007) Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks.
[7] Glaser, B. and Strauss, A.L. (1965) Discovery of substantive theory, a basic strategy underlying qualitative research. The American Behavioral Scientist, 8, 5-12. doi:10.1177/000276426500800602
[8] Lincoln, Y.S. and Guba, E.G. (1985) Naturalistic inquiry. Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks.
[9] Guba, E.G. and Lincoln, Y.S. (1989) Fourth generation evaluation. Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks.
[10] Dige, M. (2009) Occupational therapy, professional development, and ethics. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 16, 88-98.
[11] Kelly, G. and McFarlane, H. (2007) Culture or cult? The mythological nature of occupational therapy. Occupational Therapy International, 14, 188-202. doi:10.1002/oti.237
[12] Abreu, B.C. (2006) Professional identity and workplace integration. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60, 596-599. doi:10.5014/ajot.60.5.596
[13] Ikiugu, M.N. and Schultz, S. (2006) An argument for pragmatism as a foundational philosophy of occupational therapy. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 73, 86-97.
[14] Wilding, C. and Whiteford, G. (2007) Occupation and occupational therapy: Knowledge paradaims and everyday practice. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 54, 185-193. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.2006.00621.x
[15] Whiteford, G., Townsend, E. and Hocking, C. (2000) Reflections on a renaissance of occupation. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67, 61-69. doi:10.1177/000841740006700109
[16] Seruya, F.M. and Hinojosa, J. (2010) Professional and organizational commitment in paediatric occupational therapists: The influence of practice setting. Occupational Therapy International, 17, 125-134. doi:10.1002/oti.293
[17] Kielhofner, G. and Burke, J.P. (1977) Occupational therapy after 60 years: An account of changing identity and knowledge. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 31, 675-689.
[18] De Wit, L., Putman, K., Lincoln, N., Baert, I., Berman, P., Beyens, H., Bogaerts, K., Brinkmann, N., Connell, L., Dejaeger, E., De Weerdt, W., Jenni, W., Lesaffre, E., Leys, M., Louckx, F., Schuback, B., Schupp, W., Smith, B. and Feys, H. (2006) Stroke rehabilitation in Europe: what do physiotherapists and occupational therapists actually do? Stroke, 37, 1483-1489. doi:10.1161/01.STR.0000221709.23293.c2
[19] Marcia, J.E. (1966) Development and validation of ego identity status. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 3, 551-558. doi:10.1037/h0023281

comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2014 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.