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Activated Carbons Containing Dispersed Metal Oxide Particles for Removal of Methyl Mercaptan in Air

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DOI: 10.4236/msa.2011.21007    5,103 Downloads   9,366 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Activated carbons containing dispersed metal oxide particles were prepared by carbonization of phenol resin containing metal compounds followed by steam activation. Acetylacetonates of Fe, Mn and V, and Cu nitrate were used as the sources of metals. The removal of a small amount of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) in air with these activated carbons was tested in a flow system. Compared with activated carbons without metal oxides, the carbons exhibited high activity for the removal of CH3SH in air. In particular, activated carbon obtained from Novolac containing 5 wt% Cu showed excellent behavior over a long time.

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H. Tamai, M. Nakamori, M. Nishikawa and T. Shiono, "Activated Carbons Containing Dispersed Metal Oxide Particles for Removal of Methyl Mercaptan in Air," Materials Sciences and Applications, Vol. 2 No. 1, 2011, pp. 49-52. doi: 10.4236/msa.2011.21007.

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