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The Application of the Korean Dietary Pattern Score; KNHANES (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2007

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DOI: 10.4236/fns.2012.312221    3,738 Downloads   5,508 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to apply the Korean Dietary Pattern Score (KDPS) to Korean subjects based on traditional Korean-style meals. The KDPS is based on the 3-Chup Bansang (the traditional Korean daily table setting) and considers the intake of 6 major food groups according to the Korean Dietary Reference Intakes (KDRIs). The KDPS consists of 2 parts: the Korean-Style Meal Score (KSMS) and the Food Group Score (FGS). The KDPS was applied dietary data collected during the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007. Socio-demographic status, gender, age, and body mass index are all factors that have been shown to be meaningful predictors for the KDPS. When the effect of the KDPS on risk of disease was evaluated, a higher total KDPS was associated with a decreased risk of elevated systolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) and hypercholesterolemia (p < 0.05). In addition, as the KSMS increased, the risk of central obesity (p < 0.05) and hypertension (p < 0.01) significantly decreased. A higher total KDPS suggests a greater diversity of food intake, and therefore greater dietary diversity appears to lower the risk of disease. The KDPS is relevant because it integrates scores for Korean-style meal patterns and meal evaluation from a nutritional perspective. In conclusion, the KDPS is appropriate for evaluating the quality of diet, adherence to Korean-style meal patterns, and risk of related diseases. These results will be useful for evaluating the nation’s dietary patterns, nutrition, and health status when planning nutrition policies and programs.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

K. Lee, J. Oh and M. Cho, "The Application of the Korean Dietary Pattern Score; KNHANES (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2007," Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol. 3 No. 12, 2012, pp. 1688-1696. doi: 10.4236/fns.2012.312221.

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