The Changing of the Gods: Religion, Religious Transformation and the Indian Immigrant Experience

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DOI: 10.4236/sm.2012.24055    2,742 Downloads   4,661 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The Durkheimian notion that there is a close correspondence between the type of religion within a society and the structure of the society itself is now taken to be nearly axiomatic. As societies become increasingly dynamic and fragmented, however, the nexus between religion and society becomes far more complex. With globalization and widespread movements of populations struggling to maintain their identities within the contexts of both the old and new societies, changes of religion—including religious affiliation and religiosity—are inevitable. Cultural and social aspects of these changes are explored with reference to Indians migrating to the United States.

Cite this paper

Segady, T. & Shirwadkar, S. (2012). The Changing of the Gods: Religion, Religious Transformation and the Indian Immigrant Experience. Sociology Mind, 2, 428-434. doi: 10.4236/sm.2012.24055.

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