World Journal of Neuroscience

Volume 7, Issue 2 (May 2017)

ISSN Print: 2162-2000   ISSN Online: 2162-2019

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Reduction of Neurogenesis with Social Isolation Decreases Pain Sensitivity in Tail Flick Test in Male Rats

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ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pain is a complex phenomenon and in many diseases is the cardinal manifestation. In many of them, the source of pain is obscure and in turn curing pain also becomes difficult. Finding a new regulatory mechanism for pain perception and processing such as alternation of neurogenesis may establish a new treatment. Methods and Materials: In this study, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: social, isolated, morphine-treated socialized (MTS) and morphine-treated isolated (MTI). After injection of BrdU for 14 days (50 mg/kg/rat/day/i.p) and morphine for seven days from day 8 (3 mg/kg/rat/day/i.p), rats were performed tail flick test and then sacrificed. Brains were prepared for assessing neurogenesis and serums were collected for assessing glutathione. Results: In tail flick test isolated and morphine-treated isolated rats had decreased sensitivity to pain stimuli compared to social and morphine-treated socialized rats, respectively. In assessing neurogenesis, isolated and morphine-treated isolated rats had reduced numbers of newly generated neurons compared to social and morphine-treated socialized rats, respectively. Glutathione in serum in isolated and morphine-treated isolated rats increased compared to social and morphine-treated socialized rats, respectively. Conclusion: Reduction of neurogenesis was associated with reduced pain sensitivity in isolated groups. So, isolation may alleviate pain and reduce pain threshold and sensitivity.

Cite this paper

Famitafreshi, H. and Karimian, M. (2017) Reduction of Neurogenesis with Social Isolation Decreases Pain Sensitivity in Tail Flick Test in Male Rats. World Journal of Neuroscience, 7, 223-231. doi: 10.4236/wjns.2017.72018.

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