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  • 502pp. Published September 2018
  • Scientific Research Publishing,Inc.,USA
  • Category: Medicine & Healthcare
  • ISBN: 978-1-61896-529-5
  • (Paperback) USD 119.00
  • ISBN: 978-1-61896-530-1
  • (E-Book) USD 49.00

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Clinical Medical Syndromes in Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Description
  • E-Book
  • Author(s) Information
It contemplates the cosmological theories that determine Chinese Medicine, the Eight principles that regulate Traditional Chinese Medicine, the typical clinical semiological criteria, and the detailed description of the organic and functional syndromes of Chinese Medicine.
The text ends by describing the criterion of involvement of the acupuncture vessel in various medical nosological conditions.

Sample Chapter(s)
Chapter 1. Prologue (210 KB)
Components of the Book:
  • FRONT MATTER
    • Head Page
    • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contents
  • Chapter 1 Prologue
  • Chapter 2 Cosmological Theories That Regulate Chinese Medicine
    • 2.1. Cosmological Theories That Regulate Chinese Medicine
  • Chapter 3 Study of the Five Perverse Energies
    • 3.1. Wind (Feng)
    • 3.2. Heat (RE) or Fire (HUO)
    • 3.3. Cold (HAN)
    • 3.4. Humidity or Dampness (SHI)
    • 3.5. Dryness (ZAO)
    • 3.6. Internal Wind (NEI FENG)
    • 3.7. Endogenous Heat (NEI RE)
    • 3.8. Internal Cold (NEI HAN)
    • 3.9. Internal Humidity (NEI SHI)
    • 3.10. Internal Dryness (NEI ZAO)
    • 3.11. “Non-External or Internal” Causes
  • Chapter 4 The Eight Principles in Traditional Chinese Medicine
    • 4.1. Interior-Exterior Rule [BIAO-LI]
    • 4.2. Vacuity-Plenitude Rule [XU-SHI]
    • 4.3. Cold-Heat Rule (HAN-HUO)
    • 4.4. Yin-Yang Rule
  • Chapter 5 Chinese Clinical Semiology of the Eight Principles
    • 5.1. Study of Facies in Traditional Chinese Medicine
    • 5.2. Analysis of the Tongue in the Clinical Semiology of Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Chapter 6 Functional Symptoms of Chinese Medical Syndromes
    • 6.1. Plenitude
    • 6.2. Heat
    • 6.3. Cold
    • 6.4. Vacuity
    • 6.5. External or Exterior Syndrome
  • Chapter 7 Status Criteria
    • 7.1. Energy (QI) Vacuity Syndrome
    • 7.2. Vacuity Blood Syndrome (XUE)
    • 7.3. Yang Vacuity Syndrome (Also Called “Cold-Vacuity” (Vacuity + Cold))
    • 7.4. Yin Vacuity Syndrome (Also Called “Vacuity-Heat” Syndrome (Vacuity + Heat))
    • 7.5. Detailed Description of Plenitude Syndromes
  • Chapter 8 Organ/Viscus Criteria (Zhang Fu)
    • 8.1. Liver (GAN)
    • 8.2. Heart (XIN)
    • 8.3. SPLEEN-PÁNCREAS (PI)
    • 8.4. Lung (FEI)
    • 8.5. Kidney (SHEN)
  • Chapter 9 Syndrome of the Substances of Energy, Blood, Mixtures (Qi/Xue) and Organic Liquids (Qi, Xue, Jin Ye Bian Zheng)
    • 9.1. Energy Alteration Syndromes (Qi Bian Zheng)
    • 9.2. Blood Syndromes (Xue Bian Zheng)
    • 9.3. Combined Energy and Blood Syndromes (Qi Xue Bian Zheng)
    • 9.4. Syndrome of Deficiency of Organic Liquids (Jin Ye Bu Zu)
    • 9.5. Syndrome of Stagnation of Organic Liquids (Tan Yin Bian Zheng)
    • 9.6. Syndrome of Organic Liquids Stasis
  • Chapter 10 Chinese Clinical Syndromes of the Zhang
    • 10.1. Syndromes of the Spleen (PI)
    • 10.2. Clinical Chinese Syndromes of the Lung (Fei)
    • 10.3. Heart (Xin) Syndromes
    • 10.4. Xin Bao (Pericardium) Syndromes
    • 10.5. Liver Chinese Clinical Syndromes (Gan)
    • 10.6. Syndromes of the Kidney (Shen)
    • 10.7. The Six Viscus or “Fu” Syndromes
    • 10.8. San Jiao Syndromes
    • 10.9. Combined Syndromes of the Zhang Fu
  • Chapter 11 “Affected Vessel” Criterion in Acupuncture
    • 11.1. Precordialgia
    • 11.2. Dyspnoea
    • 11.3. Epistaxis
    • 11.4. Paralysis + Loss of Consciousness
    • 11.5. Buco-Dental Pathology
    • 11.6. Facial Paralysis
    • 11.7. Facial Neuralgia
    • 11.8. Cervico-Braquialgias
    • 11.9. Elbow Pain
    • 11.10. Paralysis of the Upper Members
    • 11.11. Lower Back Pain
    • 11.12. Coxalgia
    • 11.13. Paralysis of Lower Limbs
    • 11.14. Vomits
    • 11.15. Constipation
    • 11.16. Diarrhea
    • 11.17. Hematury
    • 11.18. Urinary Incontinence
    • 11.19. Genital Pain
    • 11.20. Erectile Disfucntion
    • 11.21. Vertigo
    • 11.22. Psychopathies
    • 11.23. Hypoacusis
  • Epilogue
Readership: People who are interested in traditional Chinese medicine.
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